Bujinkan Strategies of Control

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雪吊り yuki zuri at 六義園 Rikugi-en. photo by Michael Glenn

The train rattled by the Bujinkan Honbu dojo. I looked down at the knife in my hand. I looked up at Hatsumi Sensei who called me to stab at him. I plunged the knife toward him. He made a kiai that came out like the creaking, groaning sound of an old iron gate.

It was not a human sound. And he was in my face, laughing. I fell to the floor. He asked me to speak and share what I just felt with all of the students in the dojo. All I could say was that his smile made me drop.

It has been difficult to write about my training with Soke during this trip. Not because I don’t have anything to share. But because writing or talking about it is a distraction from the experience itself.

I didn’t want my own thoughts or preconceptions to intrude on the direct transmission of the teaching that Soke is giving us. So I waited. Just absorbing as much as I can. And now I feel I can begin to share.

In every single class, Hatsumi Sensei tells us not to fight, but to control. In fact, he says that this is the theme that he is teaching from. He uses the 外来語 gairaigo (borrowed from English) pronunciation of the word control. In the Japanese pronunciation this becomes コントロール kontorooru.

He tells us that what he is showing us cannot be taught. He says,

“I’m not teaching how to fight. I’m showing control. If you try to fight then it’s a very low level of budo. Please learn to control.”

Why can’t this be taught? Because it’s control, not waza. Waza (techniques) can be taught. But this is not waza. It’s control.

Soke says he’s not teaching technique anymore. He told us to have this control of あも一寸の玉 虫 amo issun no tama mushi.  In a real confrontation, this “amo” is very important.

Hatsumi Sensei’s classes are all about control. But first you have to control yourself, only then can you control the opponent. He demonstrated this over and over by controlling his opponents without even touching them. It happened to me every time I faced him. He explained it like this:

“You have to be able to not do a technique yet have it happen anyway. This is the theme for the 15 dans this year.”

One of the ways he does this is kukan no コントロール kontorooru… to control the kukan or use the kukan to control. But here is a warning: Any method you use to try to do that will probably not work! That is the mystery of this strategy.

Since I cannot possibly share everything I am experiencing here in Japan in just one article, I will write a series of articles. Maybe I will call them Bujinkan strategies of control. If you want to receive all of them, make sure to subscribe here.

When I attacked Hatsumi Sensei with the knife, he asked me to share the feeling I got from him. In that moment it was overwhelming, so I couldn’t say much except that his smile made me drop to the mat. But now that I’ve had some days to consider what happened, my feeling is that he used one of the strategies I will write about next. 次次次… The next one is the best one!

Michael GLENN
Source : https://bujinkansantamonica.blogspot.fr/2016/12/bujinkan-strategies-of-control.html
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